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. please welcome to the stage senator dianne feinstein. thank you very much for being here. >> thank you. thank you very much. thank you very much mayor lee, leader pelosi, jackie spear, david chiu. most importantly i think the finest secretary of transportation we have had, and nancy said what he has done for san francisco. i can tell you this is a secretary for california as well. [applause] whether it's riverside county, whether it's los angeles, whether it's the central valley, whether it's the san francisco bay area secretary lahood has been responsible. he's been available for phone calls. he's listened to the reasons for projects and he has moved ahead. would you give him a big round of applause please. [applause] >> well, it's time to say a prayer. it's bottom of the ninth. they have two on and one out, so everybody -- if the giants win this i think they can win the series but they need to win this so let it happen please. i can't tell you how important i feel this project is. i also can't tell you how hard it is to build anything in san francisco, so this project must
to answering your questions next week. >> after the nra briefing, senators dianne feinstein and richard blumenthal spoke to reporters. >> there have been a lot of lawmakers like yourself -- is that disappointing the have not come forward? >> let me go back to 94. it was hard. the chairman of the judiciary and the house was defeated and the speaker was defeated. the nra went out to target people who voted for the assault weapons legislation. they were critical of it, but they were targeting and threatening and carried these winds -- carried these threats out. that fear of intimidation has carried on to today. i come from the biggest state in the union, a state where rim in sync. it takes a lot of courage for a senator from about the state at a small state -- california is bigger than the 21 states and the district of columbia combined. it takes a tremendous courage and backbone for people to stand up. leaders lead. we don't follow. we have had so much since the massive shooting at the texas bell power -- bell tower, along with the increased technological killing power of weapons in the u
to say five or so bullets, willing to go after what feinstein is pushing, dianne feinstein, something on assault weapons. is there something he can go for and win because it seems to me losing will not get him any points. your thoughts? >> i think he's clearly announced that's the direction he's going to go. look, when you have an event like this, i'm very pro-second amendment, but when you see something like this occur, it causes you to think through in terms of your beliefs, do you continues to hold those beliefs given what happened. i still do, and obviously the president is going -- >> what's the smart move though? is it magazine side, mental health and -- >> you just got to it. i would suggest where he can make some significant process is the mental health side of it. when you look at what happens to gabby giffords, at virginia tech. >> give me john hinckley. something on limiting the size of these magazines, getting them down to, say, five or so bullets. willing to go after what feinstein's pushing, dianne feinstein, something on assault weapons. is there something he can go for
and gentleman, the senator from the state of california, the honorable dianne feinstein. >> mr. speaker, leader pelosi, mrs. bush, leader reed, leader mcconnell, secretary of state hillary clinton and my colleagues in government, this is a special day to honor a special person in a special place. for many years, i have followed the tragedies and victories of this uncommonly courageous and persistent woman. in 1988, she quickly rose to be the voice of democracy in burma, creating the national league for democracy. elections followed in 1990, where her party won 80% of the seats. that joy quickly turned to tragedy. the military junta nullified the election and arrested aung san suu kyi. she would spend the better part of two decades under house arrest, unable even to visit her dying husband. in 1996, i recall being approached to sponsor a burma sanctions bill. sanctions were put in place in 1997 andsanctions were only loosened in july of this year. senator mcconnell later became one of aung san suu kyi's chief advocates in the senate and we continued to work on behalf of the people in burma. in 2
the legislation. >> but there won't be more disclosure because that got voted down. dianne feinstein, the democrat who chairs the senate intelligence committee, warned that shedding more light on who is being surveilled would you wo destroy the wire tapping program which she says has worked well. >> in four years, 100 arrests to prevent something from happening in the united states. some of which comes from this program. so i think it's a vital program. >> conservative analyst says a wide dragnet is worth the cost. >> let's suppose you're a pakistani, you don't have your green card, you call your uncle, yes, you could get caught up and maybe if he's a member of the taliban there's going to be somebody in the federal government who thinks we need to ask some questions of this person. >> but if you're the person here talking to the uncle and you're caught up in this -- >> you're not caught up in the sense that you're going to jail, in the sense that anything bad is going to happen to you. >> but there are concerns about that. civil libertarian julian sanchez points out that the national security age
Search Results 0 to 6 of about 7 (some duplicates have been removed)